Auteur Sujet: La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?  (Lu 3299 fois)

0 Membres et 1 Invité sur ce sujet

Nico

  • Modérateur
  • *
  • Messages: 30 996
  • FTTH 300Mbps sur Paris 15ème (75)
    • @_GaLaK_
Internet of Islands

WRITTEN BY NICOLE STAROSIELSKI
August 12, 2015 // 08:00 AM EST

Tahiti, a figure-eight shaped island in the South Pacific with a population of around 180,000, received its first undersea fiberoptic cable in 2009—a simple branch to Hawai’i, where traffic would funnel out to the rest of the world.

As Tahiti’s only cable connection, Honotua (a name that means “link” and “backbone,” or “far ocean” in Tahitian) brought residents high-speed internet. But because of the immense amount of information that fiberoptic systems can carry, Tahiti was left with far more capacity than its residents could possibly use—not to mention the low level of adoption caused by the high cost of access, $70/month for 512 Kb/s, and $180/month for 8Mb/s. More than five years after installing the system, the two internet service providers use only 7 Gb/s of the possible 640 Gb/s.

Still, the Tahitian government is planning another system, one that would make Tahiti more than just an endpoint for transmissions.

The as-yet-unnamed project would make Tahiti the central node in a transpacific network, linking to South America on one side and China on the other.

A network like the one Tahiti is proposing might destabilize the balance of telecommunications power

“The government of French Polynesia is very seriously studying the possibilities of a new connection of its territory to the most pertinent markets in the Asia Pacific region and Latin America,” said Teva Rohfritsch, the minister of economy in charge of the Digital Strategy of French Polynesia.

Left unsaid: if Tahiti could gain entry to the elite club of island telecommunication hubs—Guam, Puerto Rico, and Cyprus, the nodes that connect the modern world’s staggering undersea cable network—it would supercharge its global significance.

***

Fiberoptic cables can span the ocean in a single hop. Direct links connect the United States and the United Kingdom, Portugal and Brazil, and Los Angeles and Chikura, just outside Tokyo. The FLAG and SeaMeWe systems include long, uninterrupted routes between the Middle East and India, from India onward to Southeast Asia, and from Australia up to China, with spurs branching off to countries in between.

Although it is possible to directly interconnect continents, our global network of undersea cables is, literally, an island network. More than half of the world’s undersea cable landings are located on islands. These include island nations (Japan and Indonesia), populous island cities (Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi) and less-intuitive cable hubs like Long Island (where much of New York’s traffic comes ashore).

There are more landing points on the islands of Hong Kong and Taiwan than on the entire mainland of China. Fifteen cable systems connect Singapore to the network; only 13 are linked to the rest of mainland Southeast Asia. Six international cables link to the Italian peninsula, while almost three times this number land on Sicilian shores. Continents often depend on islands for their communication. All of Australia’s cable traffic passes through islands, which must remain above water and politically stable, before it reaches any other continent.

Some of these island nodes are mere offshoots for global systems, with a simple branch connecting them to the main line. Others, such as Guam, are major hubs of internet traffic. With its three cable stations and 10 cables, extending to 33 landing points across the Pacific, more signal traffic moves through Guam than through many nations around the world. Compare this, for example, to the number of undersea cables linking out from Argentina (5), Canada (4), or Bangladesh (1).

Every ocean and sea has a number of critical intermediary islands. In the Mediterranean, cables stop on Sicily, Crete, and Cyprus. Puerto Rico and the British Virgin Islands are nodes in the Caribbean, and in the Indian Ocean, islands like Mauritius are stopping points for cables between Africa and India. In the Atlantic, Bermuda and Spain’s Canary Islands have long been key hubs for communications traffic.

A significant number of these are hubs in part due to the British empire’s investment in a globe-spanning telegraph system during the 19th century. Islands were important to colonial expansion precisely because of their insularity. Physically separated from the mainland, they could be more easily managed, insulated from threatening populations, and secured by military forces.

In the colonial era, the British staked out a global archipelago. Today, small islands are trying to harness the flows of internet traffic across the ocean themselves—yet they almost always have to link up with one global power or another. The goal is not simply to secure a single cable line, but to position themselves as intermediary points for transoceanic flows.

***

The project the Tahitian government has proposed is a completely innovative one—with a route as original as the cable planned to link London and Tokyo via the Arctic Ocean.

In many ways, this system would both reflect and support growing Chinese investment not only in South America, but in French Polynesia itself. This prospective link would not build on the older colonial regime (the French Government funded the Honotua link), but on Chinese economic power.

As an island hub, Tahiti would share the burden of generating both the traffic and the profit for the cable system. With multiple cables, telecommunications companies might be motivated to interconnect there. One potential plan is to give away the capacity on the existing line in order to lure them in. A second cable could open up new possibilities for tech industries that require redundancy (after all, if the existing system goes out, only a small percentage of the capacity could be backed up via satellite).

Establishing another hub in the Pacific, and one outside of the United States, would be a benefit to the network as a whole, especially given the NSA’s monitoring practices and the widely known difficulty of landing on US soil. The global undersea network needs more diverse routes. Otherwise, disasters like the 2006 Hengchun earthquake, piracy off the coast of Vietnam, or the digging of an elderly women in Georgia can simply shut of parts of the network. From a technical perspective, it seems to be a win-win situation.

Despite such benefits, the telecommunications industry and investment banks don’t usually support these kinds of projects. They tend to stick with the tried-and-true, which is why undersea networks keep linking to Guam, Puerto Rico, and Cyprus. It is also why the network of undersea cables is one of our most durable technical infrastructures. The cable-supply business has historically been dominated by the British, Americans, French, and for a period, the Japanese: the Chinese have yet to make headway in the construction of transoceanic cables. A network like the one Tahiti is proposing might destabilize the balance of telecommunications power, even more so if the Chinese government chooses to fund it (and the French and Americans choose not to interfere with it).

But, every year entrepreneurs propose new undersea cable projects, and every year, many of these fail. They are posted as prospective links on the cable maps, and subsequently disappear. Innovative projects like this one tend to disappear more often, given that the industry is conservative on the whole.

Over five years ago, the South Pacific Island Network (SPIN) was designed to connect North America and Hawai‘i to Australia and New Zealand, by hopping from American Samoa, Samoa, Wallis and Futuna, Fiji, New Caledonia, and Norfolk Island. Although the plan never gained traction with the telecommunications carriers, piece-by-piece links have been built out in the area. This is a promising sign for island networks. Tahiti’s officials are right to be conservative in their proclamations, but signs suggest the longstanding balance of power in the global information network may be due for a disruption.


http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-internets-undersea-infrastructure-is-due-for-a-disruption

Polynesia

  • Client Orange Fibre
  • *
  • Messages: 1 113
  • FTTH 100/100 - Alençon (61)
    • Développeur web en devenir (en construction)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #1 le: 22 août 2015 à 00:00:39 »
Viva Fénua  ;D

Nico

  • Modérateur
  • *
  • Messages: 30 996
  • FTTH 300Mbps sur Paris 15ème (75)
    • @_GaLaK_
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #2 le: 24 août 2015 à 22:40:45 »
Pour ceux qui sont pas fan de l'Anglais :

Quand une universitaire américaine voit Tahiti devenir un hub du Net mondial

Papeete, le 20 août 2015 - Dans un livre que vient de publier une universitaire américaine sur l'organisation des câbles sous-marin de l'internet mondial, un chapitre entier est consacré aux projets de deuxième et troisième câbles polynésiens. Elle y voit une opportunité historique pour le Pays de prendre une place centrale dans la toile mondiale.

Dans son livre "The Undersea Network" publié cette année par les éditions de l'Université de Duke, l'Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, Nicole Starosielski, consacre un chapitre entier aux ambitions numériques polynésiennes dans le grand jeu mondial des câbles sous-marins.

Ces infrastructures hautement stratégiques pour le réseau, et donc l'économie mondiale, sont une aubaine particulièrement recherchée par les îles à travers le monde. L'universitaire révèle ainsi dans ce chapitre, qui a été publié sur le site Motherboard, (en anglais) que plus de la moitié des sorties des câbles sous-marins mondiaux sont situées sur des îles. Et quelques îles en particulier. Ainsi, Hong Kong et Taiwan recensent chacune plus d'arrivées de câbles que toute la Chine continentale. Trois fois plus de câbles arrivent en Sicile qu'en Italie. Dans le Pacifique, c'est Guam qui détient la palme avec dix arrivées de câbles.

La raison principalement historique : les anciennes colonies anglaises ont toujours été utilisées comme des points de passage essentiels dans l'empire britannique. C'est la facilité de les défendre militairement et de gérer leurs petites populations qui leur donnait un avantage. Mais aujourd'hui ce sont les îles elles-mêmes, du moins celles qui sont suffisamment stables politiquement et économiquement pour rassurer les investisseurs, qui se positionnent comme des points d'interconnexion incontournables entre les continents.

Et à ce jeu-là, ceux qui se positionnent bien peuvent y gagner des emplois, des ressources économiques conséquentes et un accès privilégié au réseau mondial. Ce n'est malheureusement pas le cas de Tahiti.

7GB/S UTILISÉS SUR… 640

Comme le note Nicole Starosielski, notre câble Honotua posé en 2009 est gravement sous-exploité, avec 7 Gb/s utilisés sur les 640 Gb/s potentiels. Elle avance plusieurs explications : une adoption faible à cause de coûts d'accès très élevés (elle les estime entre 70 et 180 dollars par mois), et bien sûr l'effet "cul-de-sac numérique" causé par l'absence d'un deuxième câble.

Dans son livre, l'universitaire cite Teva Rohfritch, notre ministre du développement numérique : "le gouvernement polynésien est très sérieusement en train d'étudier les possibilités d'une nouvelle connexion de son territoire avec les marchés les plus pertinents, dans la région Asie-Pacifique et l'Amérique latine".

Une vision saluée dans le livre, qui assure que de "gagner une entrée dans le club d'élite des îles hubs de télécommunication – Guam, Puerto Rico et Chypres, les nodules qui connectent le stupéfiant réseau de câbles sous-marins mondial – la propulserait sur le devant de la scène planétaire."

Au moins un autre câble permettrait de partager le trafic avec les internautes polynésiens, et le Pays pourrait même offrir les capacités libres de Honotua en échange de sa construction. Les entreprises de télécommunication auraient enfin une bonne raison de faire passer leurs projets de câbles par Tahiti, et toute une industrie technologique pourrait èmerger.

POUR LES CHINOIS, ÉVITER LA NSA

D'autant que le plan potentiel le plus réaliste passerait par des capitaux chinois, "ce qui accompagnerait les investissements chinois en Amérique du Sud comme en Polynésie, et ne se baserait pas sur des liens coloniaux mais sur la puissance économique montante."


Pour l'auteur, "établir un nouveau hub dans le Pacifique, hors des Etats-Unis, serait bénéfique pour le réseau dans son ensemble, en particulier en connaissant les pratiques d'espionnage de la NSA et la difficulté bien connue de faire atterrir des câbles sur le sol américain. Le réseau sous-marin a besoin de routes plus diversifiées, autrement des catastrophes comme le tremblement de terre de Hengchung en 2006, les pirates au large du Vietnam ou une vieille femme qui creuse dans son jardin en Géorgie peuvent simplement couper le réseau."

UNE PRIME AUX HUBS EXISTANTS

L'universitaire pointe tout de même une grosse difficulté : l'industrie des télécoms et les banques ne soutiennent pas, en général, des projets comme le nôtre. Ils "ont tendance à rester sur des projets testés et approuvés, ce qui explique pourquoi les câbles continuent d'affluer vers Guam, Puerto Rico et Chypres". Et Hawaii, donc.

L'autre handicap est de compter sur les Chinois, qui ont un énorme retard sur leur infrastructure en fibres optiques sous-marines. D'autant que la France et les États-Unis pourraient mettre leur veto à un projet chinois si stratégique passant par Tahiti… Mais Nicole Starosielski continue de nous encourager : "Les officiels de Tahiti ont raison d'être prudents sur leurs déclarations, mais les signes montrent que l'ancien équilibre des pouvoirs dans le réseau de l'information mondial est peut-être mûr pour un chamboulement."


http://www.tahiti-infos.com/Quand-une-universitaire-americaine-voit-Tahiti-devenir-un-hub-du-Net-mondial_a134792.html

mattmatt73

  • Expert.
  • Client Bbox fibre "câble"
  • *
  • Messages: 5 745
  • vancia (69)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #3 le: 24 août 2015 à 23:52:03 »
sérieux, il y a des ministres en polynésie ?

ça va énerver corrector, tous ces gens payés à une activité incertaine.

mais a quoi ca sert un gouvernement la bas, vu qu'a la fin c'est paris qui doit décider?

corrector

  • Invité
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #4 le: 25 août 2015 à 00:42:11 »
ça va énerver corrector, tous ces gens payés à une activité incertaine.

mais a quoi ca sert un gouvernement la bas, vu qu'a la fin c'est paris qui doit décider?
Encore un qui n'a strictement RIEN compris!

Polynesia

  • Client Orange Fibre
  • *
  • Messages: 1 113
  • FTTH 100/100 - Alençon (61)
    • Développeur web en devenir (en construction)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #5 le: 25 août 2015 à 11:06:37 »
Il y a un gouvernement en Polynésie mais il change trop souvent...  :-\

mattmatt73

  • Expert.
  • Client Bbox fibre "câble"
  • *
  • Messages: 5 745
  • vancia (69)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #6 le: 25 août 2015 à 11:09:08 »
Il y a un gouvernement en Polynésie mais il change trop souvent...  :-\

surtout, a quoi il sert ?

c'est comme si on avait des ministres en Savoie, j'immagine.
Ca fait bien sur la carte de visite, mais ils doivent avoir autant de pouvoirs qu'un conseiller départemental?

vivien

  • Administrateur
  • *
  • Messages: 28 262
    • Twitter LaFibre.info
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #7 le: 25 août 2015 à 13:50:44 »
La Polynésie Française (118 îles) a besoin d'un gouvernement car ils sont un peu plus indépendant que le département de la Savoie.

Ils ont leur propre monnaie par exemple : Le franc Pacifique

Billet de 10 000 Francs CFP soit 83€ :


Le franc Pacifique, également connu sous le nom de franc CFP (CFP pour "Colonies françaises du Pacifique"), est une monnaie qui a cours dans les collectivités françaises de l’océan Pacifique : Nouvelle-Calédonie, Polynésie française et Wallis-et-Futuna.

1 000 XPF = 8,38 € (exactement)
1 € ≈ 119,3317 XPF (environ)

cf Wikipedia : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franc_Pacifique

Snickerss

  • Expert Free + Client Bbox fibre FTTH
  • Modérateur
  • *
  • Messages: 4 067
  • Mes paroles n'engagent que moi :)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #8 le: 25 août 2015 à 16:32:19 »
Par contre éviter la NSA, ils sont encore naïfs a ce point les chinois ? Je ne crois pas xD

Sympa cette idée. Si ça peut créer des postes pour la pré retraite, faut pas hésiter.

Nico

  • Modérateur
  • *
  • Messages: 30 996
  • FTTH 300Mbps sur Paris 15ème (75)
    • @_GaLaK_
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #9 le: 25 août 2015 à 16:35:02 »
Tant qu'on me laisse le RIP FTTH de la Polynésie...

corrector

  • Invité
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #10 le: 25 août 2015 à 20:03:21 »
La Polynésie Française a besoin d'un gouvernement pour reprocher au gouvernement français les essais atomiques et dire que le territoire a été sans doute contaminé (très bonne stratégie pour attirer les touristes d'ailleurs).

mattmatt73

  • Expert.
  • Client Bbox fibre "câble"
  • *
  • Messages: 5 745
  • vancia (69)
La Polynésie Française futur HUB des câbles sous-marins ?
« Réponse #11 le: 25 août 2015 à 20:07:48 »
La Polynésie Française a besoin d'un gouvernement pour reprocher au gouvernement français les essais atomiques et dire que le territoire a été sans doute contaminé (très bonne stratégie pour attirer les touristes d'ailleurs).

les dom des caraïbes reprochent l’esclavage, eux les essais nucléaires, la victimisation est une stratégie facile.


 

Mobile View